The most common design mistakes of sheet metal parts

This blog post highlights the prevalent design errors found in sheet metal parts and provides valuable insights on how to avoid them. From material selection and bend radius to hole placement and edge distortion, we cover the most critical design factors that affect the final product’s performance and manufacturability. By addressing these common design mistakes, readers can enhance the overall quality and functionality of their sheet metal parts.

sheet metal parts

Introduction

What is sheet metal design

Sheet metal design is the process of designing structures or parts made of sheet metal. It involves shaping and manipulating the metal to achieve the desired outcome, taking into account factors such as thickness, materials, and manufacturing processes. The design process includes conceptualization, modeling, prototyping, testing, and refinement to create functional, reliable, and cost-effective products that meet the required specifications and standards. manufacturing processes. The design process includes conceptualization, modeling, prototyping, testing, and refinement to create functional, reliable, and cost-effective products that meet the required specifications and standards manufacturing processes. The design process includes conceptualization, modeling, prototyping, testing

Importance of designing sheet metal parts correctly

Designing sheet metal parts correctly is crucial for achieving high-quality, cost-effective, and compliant products. It ensures the part’s functionality, reduces manufacturing costs, and meets regulatory standards. A well-designed part can prevent issues like material fatigue, improper fitment, and structural failure. It also optimizes production efficiency and reduces errors, resulting in time and resource savings. Compliance with regulations and standards is critical, particularly in industries where safety and quality standards are vital.

E-coating parts

Design Considerations

Material Selection

Choosing the right metal

clear anodizing aluminum parts

When designing sheet metal parts, choosing the right metal is crucial for ensuring the functionality, durability, and overall quality of the final product. Factors to consider when selecting a metal include its strength, ductility, corrosion resistance, formability, and cost.

For example, if the part will be subjected to high stress or weight, a strong and durable metal such as stainless steel or titanium may be the best choice. If the part will be formed into complex shapes, a more malleable metal such as aluminum or copper may be preferred.

Corrosion resistance is also important, particularly in outdoor or harsh environments. In these cases, metals such as zinc-coated steel or galvanized steel may be appropriate.

Ultimately, selecting the right metal for sheet metal parts requires a careful consideration of the specific requirements of the part and its intended use. By taking these factors into account, designers can create parts that not only function properly, but also meet the desired performance standards and cost constraints.

Material thickness

When designing sheet metal parts, the thickness of the material is an important factor to consider. Material thickness can affect the strength, durability, and cost of the part.

Choosing the right thickness for the material is critical to ensure that the part can withstand the intended loads and stresses. A thicker material will generally be stronger and more durable, but also more expensive. Conversely, a thinner material may be less expensive but may not be able to withstand as much stress or weight.

In addition to strength and durability, material thickness can also impact the manufacturability of the part. Thicker materials may require more force or different tools to form, while thinner materials may be more prone to bending or warping during the manufacturing process.

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Manufacturing Process

Understanding the manufacturing process

sheet metal manufacturing services

When designing sheet metal parts, it is crucial to have a thorough understanding of the manufacturing process to ensure that the part can be efficiently and effectively produced. The manufacturing process includes steps such as cutting, bending, welding, and finishing, and each of these steps can affect the final product. manufacturing process to ensure that the part can be efficiently and effectively produced. The manufacturing process includes steps such as cutting, bending, welding, and finishing, and each of these steps manufacturing process to ensure that the part can be efficiently and effectively produced. The manufacturing process includes steps such as cutting manufacturing process to ensure that the part can be

For example, when designing a part that will be bent, it is important to consider the minimum bend radius and the amount of material that will be stretched or compressed during the bending process. This can impact the strength and durability of the final product.

Similarly, when designing a part that will be welded, it is important to consider the type of weld that will be used and how it will affect the overall strength and appearance of the part.

By understanding the manufacturing process, designers can optimize their designs for manufacturability and minimize the amount of time and resources required to produce the final product. This can result in a more efficient and cost-effective manufacturing process, as well as a higher quality final product that meets the desired performance standards. manufacturing process, designers can optimize their designs for manufacturability and minimize the amount of time and resources required to produce the final product. This can result in a more efficient manufacturing process, designers can optimize their designs for manufacturability and minimize the amount of time

Designing for manufacturability

Material selection for sheet metal

Designing for manufacturability is a critical consideration when designing sheet metal parts. By optimizing the design for efficient and cost-effective manufacturing, designers can save time, reduce waste, and improve the overall quality of the final product.manufacturing, designers can save time, reduce waste, and improve the overall quality of the final productmanufacturing, designers can save

When designing for manufacturability, designers must consider factors such as material selection, part complexity, and production techniques. For example, using standard sheet sizes and minimizing part complexity can reduce waste and improve efficiency during the cutting process. Similarly, designing parts with uniform wall thicknesses and avoiding sharp corners can improve the ease of bending and reduce the likelihood of defects.

Laser cutting

Designing for manufacturability also requires collaboration with manufacturing engineers and technicians to ensure that the design can be effectively produced using the available equipment and techniques. By incorporating feedback from the manufacturing team early in the design process, designers can avoid costly and time-consuming revisions later on. manufacturing engineers and technicians to ensure that the design can be effectively produced using the available equipment and techniques. By incorporating feedback from the manufacturing team early in manufacturing engineers and technicians to ensure that the design can

In summary, designing for manufacturability is essential to creating high-quality sheet metal parts that can be efficiently and cost-effectively produced. By considering manufacturing constraints and collaborating with manufacturing experts, designers can optimize their designs and achieve the best possible results.

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Design Features

Bends and folds

sheet metal parts

Design features such as bends and folds are commonly used in sheet metal parts to add strength, stability, and aesthetic appeal. When incorporating bends and folds into a sheet metal design, it is important to consider several factors to ensure that the part functions properly and can be efficiently manufactured.

One important consideration is the minimum bend radius, which is the smallest radius that the material can be bent without cracking or deforming. Designers must ensure that the bend radius is appropriate for the material thickness and the intended use of the part. They must also consider the orientation and direction of the bend to ensure that it provides the desired strength and stability.

Another important consideration is the location and placement of folds in the design. Folds can be used to create complex shapes and add rigidity to the part, but they can also add complexity to the manufacturing process. Designers must ensure that folds are placed in locations that can be easily formed and do not interfere with other manufacturing processes, such as cutting or welding. manufacturing process. Designers must ensure that folds are placed in locations that can be easily formed and do not interferemanufacturing

In summary, incorporating bends and folds into a sheet metal design can add strength, stability, and aesthetic appeal. However, designers must carefully consider the minimum bend radius, orientation and direction of the bend, and placement of folds to ensure that the part functions properly and can be efficiently manufactured.

Holes and cutouts

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Holes and cutouts are common design features in sheet metal parts that serve various purposes, such as providing ventilation, reducing weight, and facilitating assembly. However, when incorporating holes and cutouts into a sheet metal design, designers must consider several factors to ensure that the part functions properly and can be efficiently manufactured.

One important consideration is the size and shape of the hole or cutout. The size and shape must be appropriate for the intended function of the part and the material thickness to avoid compromising the strength and stability of the part. Additionally, designers must consider the placement of the hole or cutout to avoid interfering with other design features, such as bends or folds.

Another consideration is the edge quality of the hole or cutout. Sharp edges can cause safety hazards and can also be difficult to manufacture. Designers must ensure that the edges are smooth and free of burrs to avoid injuring workers during assembly or installation.manufacture. Designers must ensure that the edges are smooth and free of burrs to avoid.

Stamping process

Finally, designers must consider the manufacturing process when incorporating holes and cutouts into their designs. The size and placement of the holes or cutouts must be optimized for efficient manufacturing and to minimize waste. Additionally, designers must ensure that the holes or cutouts do not interfere with other manufacturing processes, such as cutting or welding. manufacturing process when incorporating holes and cutouts into their designs. The size and placement of the holes or cutouts must be optimized for efficient manufacturing and to minimize waste. Additionally, designers must ensure that the holes or cutouts do not interfere with other manufacturing processes, such manufacturing process when incorporating holes and cutouts into their designs. The size and placement of the holes or cutouts must be optimized manufacturing process when incorporating holes and cutouts into

In summary, incorporating holes and cutouts into a sheet metal design can provide numerous benefits, but designers must carefully consider the size, shape, placement, and edge quality of the holes or cutouts to ensure that the part functions properly and can be efficiently manufactured.

Embossing and debossing Manufacturing Process

Embossing and debossing are common design features in sheet metal parts that can add visual interest and improve the functionality of the part. When incorporating embossing or debossing into a sheet metal design, designers must consider several factors to ensure that the part can be efficiently manufactured and meets the desired performance standards.

One important consideration is the depth and size of the embossed or debossed feature. The depth and size must be appropriate for the material thickness and the intended use of the part. Additionally, designers must consider the location and placement of the feature to avoid interfering with other design features, such as bends or folds.

Another consideration is the manufacturing process used for creating the embossed or debossed feature. There are several methods for creating embossed or debossed features in sheet metal, including stamping, pressing, and laser cutting. The choice of manufacturing process will depend on factors such as the complexity of the design and the size and volume of the production run.

sheet metal Surface treatment

Designers must also consider the potential impact of the embossing or debossing on the structural integrity of the part. Embossing or debossing can cause stress concentrations, which can lead to cracking or failure of the part. Designers must ensure that the part is designed with adequate reinforcement to support the embossed or debossed feature.

In summary, incorporating embossing or debossing into a sheet metal design can add visual interest and improve the functionality of the part. However, designers must carefully consider the size, depth, location, and manufacturing process of the embossed or debossed feature to ensure that the part can be efficiently manufactured and meets the desired performance standards.

Common Mistakes in Sheet Metal Design

Overlooking material selection and thickness

sheet metal manufacturer modo rapid

When it comes to designing sheet metal parts, there are several common mistakes that designers must be careful to avoid. Overlooking material selection and thickness is one such mistake that can lead to serious issues. Choosing the wrong material can have a significant impact on the performance of the finished part, and selecting the wrong thickness can cause problems such as buckling or deformation. As a designer, it’s essential to take the time to carefully consider the material selection and thickness of the sheet metal to ensure that the finished product is up to par.

Another mistake to avoid is failing to account for the manufacturing process when designing sheet metal parts. By optimizing the design for the manufacturing process, designers can minimize waste, reduce production time, and lower costs. It’s important to keep these factors in mind to ensure that the manufacturing process is as efficient as possible.

Details matter in sheet metal design as well, and it’s crucial to pay attention to them to avoid costly mistakes. Forgetting to account for the placement of holes, cutouts, or fasteners can cause problems during assembly or operation, while ignoring tolerances or surface finishes can result in a part that doesn’t meet the desired specifications. As a designer, taking a careful and detail-oriented approach can help avoid these common mistakes and create sheet metal parts that function effectively and efficiently.

Ignoring manufacturing process requirements

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Ignoring manufacturing process requirements when designing sheet metal parts is a common mistake that can lead to significant problems during production. The design of the part should take into account the specific requirements of the manufacturing process, such as the type of equipment and tools needed, the tolerances and finishes required, and the feasibility of the design.

Designing a part without considering these requirements can result in production delays, increased costs, and lower-quality parts. For example, a design that requires a specialized tool or equipment may not be feasible for high-volume production, while a part with tight tolerances may require additional processing steps to achieve the desired finish.

By ignoring manufacturing process requirements, designers risk creating designs that are difficult or impossible to produce. It’s crucial to work closely with manufacturing teams to understand the specific requirements of the process and incorporate them into the design. This ensures that the part can be manufactured efficiently, cost-effectively, and to the desired specifications.

Poor design features

Inconsistent bend radii

what is sheet metal parts

Poor design features can cause a range of problems in sheet metal parts, such as reduced functionality, poor performance, and increased costs. One such feature is inconsistent bend radii, which occurs when the bends in the sheet metal have different radii or sharp corners.

Inconsistent bend radii can lead to several issues, such as increased stress concentrations, uneven bending, and poor dimensional accuracy. The uneven distribution of stress can cause deformation, cracking, or even failure under load. Additionally, uneven bending can cause difficulties during assembly, leading to poor fit and alignment of parts.

To avoid inconsistent bend radii, designers must ensure that the bend radii are consistent throughout the part. This can be achieved by specifying a consistent bend radius and ensuring that the tooling used for bending is consistent as well. Additionally, using a radius that is at least the thickness of the material can help prevent stress concentrations and deformation.

In summary, inconsistent bend radii is a poor design feature that can cause a range of issues in sheet metal parts. Designers must ensure that the bend radii are consistent throughout the part and that the tooling used for bending is consistent as well. By doing so, designers can create sheet metal parts that function effectively, efficiently, and to the desired specifications.

Too-tight bends

sheet metal machine shell prototypes

When designing sheet metal parts, it is important to pay close attention to the bend radius of the part. If the bend radius is too small or tight, it can result in a number of issues such as cracking, tearing, or even complete failure of the part. This is because when a sheet metal part is bent, the metal is stretched and compressed along the bend line, and if the bend radius is too tight, the metal will be stretched beyond its limit, leading to failure.

To avoid these problems, it is recommended to design sheet metal parts with a bend radius that is at least equal to the thickness of the sheet metal being used. This ensures that the metal can be bent without being stretched beyond its limits. Additionally, it is important to consider the material properties of the sheet metal being used, as some materials are more ductile than others and can withstand tighter bend radii.

Overall, when designing sheet metal parts, it is crucial to balance the desired shape and function of the part with the limitations of the material being used. Careful consideration of the bend radius can help ensure that the part is both structurally sound and able to be manufactured efficiently.

Improper hole and cutout placement

sheet metal design and prototype

When designing sheet metal parts, the placement of holes and cutouts is a critical consideration. Improper placement of these features can lead to structural weaknesses and manufacturing difficulties that can compromise the integrity and functionality of the part.

One common issue that can arise from improper hole placement is distortion of the surrounding metal. If holes are placed too close to an edge or a bend, the metal may deform or even tear during manufacturing. Additionally, holes that are not properly aligned can cause misalignment or assembly issues in the final product.

Similarly, improper placement of cutouts can lead to problems such as weakened structural integrity, difficulty in assembly, and increased manufacturing costs. Cutouts that are too close to bends or edges can cause deformation or failure of the metal during manufacturing, while cutouts that are too large or irregular can make it difficult to properly align and assemble the final product.

aluminum sheet metal fabrication.webp

To avoid these issues, it is important to carefully consider the placement of holes and cutouts in the design phase. Best practices include ensuring that holes are at least a minimum distance away from bends or edges, using proper alignment and spacing, and ensuring that cutouts are sized and placed appropriately for the intended function of the part.

In summary, improper hole and cutout placement can lead to a host of problems when designing sheet metal parts. By carefully considering these features during the design phase, manufacturers can avoid these issues and produce parts that are structurally sound, easy to assemble, and cost-effective to manufacture.

Excessive embossing or debossing

Modo rapid sheet metal prototype fabrication

Embossing and debossing are common sheet metal forming techniques used to add texture, depth, and functionality to parts. However, excessive use of these techniques can lead to a number of issues that compromise the integrity and manufacturability of the part.

One common problem that arises from excessive embossing or debossing is thinning of the metal. When too many embossed or debossed features are added to a part, the metal in those areas is stretched and thinned, which can lead to cracking, tearing, or even complete failure of the part. This is particularly true in areas where the metal is already thin, such as near edges or bends.

Additionally, excessive embossing or debossing can increase the cost and complexity of manufacturing. These features require additional tooling and processing time, which can drive up the cost of production. Furthermore, if embossed or debossed features are too close together or too intricate, they can be difficult or impossible to manufacture, leading to additional delays and costs.

To avoid these issues, it is important to carefully consider the placement and complexity of embossed and debossed features during the design phase. Best practices include using embossing and debossing sparingly, ensuring that features are properly spaced and sized, and avoiding areas of the part that are already thin or prone to failure.

In summary, excessive embossing or debossing can lead to a number of issues when designing sheet metal parts, including thinning of the metal and increased manufacturing costs. By using these techniques judiciously and considering their impact during the design phase, manufacturers can produce parts that are both functional and cost-effective to manufacture.

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Inadequate tolerances and margins

When designing sheet metal parts, tolerances and margins are critical considerations that can impact both the functionality and manufacturability of the part. Inadequate tolerances and margins can lead to a number of issues, including dimensional inaccuracies, fitment problems, and manufacturing difficulties.

One common issue that arises from inadequate tolerances is dimensional inaccuracies. If tolerances are too tight, it can be difficult or impossible to manufacture parts to the required specifications. Conversely, if tolerances are too loose, parts may not fit together properly or may fail to meet the necessary functional requirements.

Similarly, inadequate margins can lead to problems such as distortion, warping, or tearing during manufacturing. Margins that are too small can make it difficult for the metal to be properly formed or cut, leading to defects or scrap. Additionally, inadequate margins can make it difficult to assemble parts or apply coatings, further complicating the manufacturing process.

To avoid these issues, it is important to carefully consider the necessary tolerances and margins for each feature of the part during the design phase. Best practices include using established industry standards and guidelines, conducting thorough testing and analysis, and working closely with manufacturers to ensure that the design can be produced efficiently and cost-effectively.

In summary, inadequate tolerances and margins can lead to a variety of problems when designing sheet metal parts. By carefully considering these factors during the design phase and working closely with manufacturers, designers can ensure that parts are both functional and easy to manufacture.

Neglecting assembly and integration considerations

When designing sheet metal parts, it is important to consider the assembly and integration of the part within the larger system. Neglecting these considerations can lead to issues such as misaligned or poorly fitting parts, difficulty in assembly, and reduced functionality of the final product.

One common problem that arises from neglecting assembly and integration considerations is poor fitment between parts. If parts are not designed to fit together properly, it can be difficult or impossible to assemble the final product. Additionally, poor fitment can lead to misalignment, which can compromise the structural integrity and functionality of the part.

Another issue that can arise from neglecting assembly and integration considerations is difficulty in manufacturing. Parts that are difficult or time-consuming to assemble can increase the cost and complexity of production, leading to delays and increased costs.

To avoid these issues, it is important to carefully consider the assembly and integration of the part within the larger system during the design phase. Best practices include ensuring that parts are properly aligned and sized, incorporating features such as tabs and notches for easy assembly, and testing the part in the final product to ensure proper fitment and functionality.

In summary, neglecting assembly and integration considerations can lead to a number of issues when designing sheet metal parts, including poor fitment, difficulty in assembly, and reduced functionality of the final product. By considering these factors during the design phase and working closely with manufacturers, designers can ensure that parts are both functional and easy to assemble.

manufacturing process requirements

Designing sheet metal parts requires careful consideration of the manufacturing process and the requirements of the production line. Neglecting these requirements can lead to issues such as increased costs, decreased efficiency, and reduced quality of the final product.

One common issue that arises from neglecting manufacturing process requirements is difficulty in production. Parts that are designed without consideration for the manufacturing process may require additional tooling or processing steps, which can increase the complexity and cost of production. Additionally, parts that are difficult or time-consuming to produce can lead to delays and increased lead times.

Another problem that can arise from neglecting manufacturing process requirements is decreased quality of the final product. If parts are not designed with the manufacturing process in mind, they may be prone to defects or may not meet the required specifications. This can lead to issues such as scrap, rework, or even product failure.

To avoid these issues, it is important to carefully consider the manufacturing process requirements when designing sheet metal parts. Best practices include working closely with manufacturers to understand their capabilities and limitations, designing parts that are easy to manufacture and assemble, and testing the part in the final product to ensure quality and functionality.

In summary, neglecting manufacturing process requirements can lead to a variety of issues when designing sheet metal parts, including increased costs, decreased efficiency, and reduced quality of the final product. By considering these factors during the design phase and working closely with manufacturers, designers can ensure that parts are both functional and cost-effective to produce.

Tips for Avoiding Sheet Metal Design Mistakes

Work closely with a manufacturer

Hard anodising aluminum part

When designing sheet metal parts, it is important to avoid mistakes that can impact the functionality, manufacturability, and quality of the final product. One of the most effective ways to avoid these mistakes is to work closely with a manufacturer throughout the design process.

Manufacturers can provide valuable insight into the capabilities and limitations of their equipment and processes, which can inform the design of the part. Additionally, manufacturers can help identify potential issues early on in the design phase, which can save time and reduce costs.

Other tips for avoiding sheet metal design mistakes include using established industry standards and guidelines, conducting thorough testing and analysis, and incorporating features such as tabs and notches for easy assembly.

It is also important to consider the assembly and integration of the part within the larger system, as neglecting these considerations can lead to issues such as poor fitment and difficulty in assembly.

Finally, designers should pay close attention to tolerances and margins, ensuring that they are adequate for each feature of the part and that they are consistent throughout the design.

In summary, working closely with a manufacturer, using established standards and guidelines, considering assembly and integration, and paying close attention to tolerances and margins can all help to avoid sheet metal design mistakes. By following these best practices, designers can ensure that parts are both functional and cost-effective to produce.

Design for manufacturability

Different Types of Sheet Metals

Designing sheet metal parts with manufacturability in mind is crucial to avoiding mistakes that can lead to increased costs, production delays, and lower quality parts. Designing for manufacturability means taking into account the limitations and capabilities of the manufacturing process from the beginning of the design phase.

To achieve this, it is important to work closely with the manufacturer to understand their capabilities and limitations. This includes understanding their available equipment, the tolerances they can achieve, and the required lead times. By taking into account these factors, designers can ensure that their designs are optimized for the manufacturing process.

Another important factor in designing for manufacturability is simplifying the design. This means using the fewest number of parts and features possible, and avoiding unnecessarily complex geometries. By simplifying the design, parts can be manufactured more quickly and with fewer errors.

It is also important to consider the materials used in the design. Different materials have different characteristics, including strength, ductility, and resistance to corrosion. Understanding these characteristics can inform the design of the part, ensuring that the materials are used in the most effective way.

Finally, designers should consider incorporating features such as standard hole sizes, common radii, and other elements that are easy to manufacture. By incorporating these features, parts can be manufactured more quickly and with greater precision.

In summary, designing for manufacturability is essential to avoiding sheet metal design mistakes. By working closely with the manufacturer, simplifying the design, selecting appropriate materials, and incorporating easy-to-manufacture features, designers can ensure that their parts are both functional and cost-effective to produce.

Incorporate proper design features

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One important feature to consider is material thickness. Choosing the appropriate thickness for the intended application can prevent issues such as warping, cracking, or failure under stress. Additionally, incorporating rounded edges and smooth transitions can prevent sharp corners, which can be hazardous and cause injury. Another important design feature is bend relief, which helps prevent cracking or distortion during the bending process. It’s also crucial to consider the assembly process when designing sheet metal parts, as proper alignment and tolerance can ensure a smooth and efficient assembly. By paying attention to these design features, you can avoid common sheet metal design mistakes and create high-quality, functional parts.

Account for tolerances and margins

gold anodizing aluminum part

When designing sheet metal parts, accounting for tolerances and margins is crucial to avoid costly mistakes. Tolerances refer to the allowable deviation from the intended dimension, while margins refer to the space required for the bending or forming process. It’s essential to consider these factors during the design process to ensure the final product meets the required specifications. Overlooking tolerances or margins can result in parts that don’t fit correctly or don’t function as intended. Another important consideration is to avoid designs with tight radii or acute angles, as these can result in stress concentration, which can lead to cracking or failure. By accounting for tolerances and margins in your sheet metal design, you can ensure that your parts meet the required specifications and function properly, without encountering costly errors or delays in production.

Consider assembly and integration requirements manufacturer

To avoid sheet metal design mistakes, it’s essential to consider the assembly and integration requirements of the manufacturer. Understanding the manufacturing process and capabilities of the manufacturer can help you design parts that are easy to assemble, which can save time and cost in production. You should also consider the assembly order and any necessary fixturing or tooling required for assembly. Additionally, communicating with the manufacturer can help ensure that your design meets their requirements and capabilities, which can reduce the risk of errors or rework. It’s also important to consider how the sheet metal part will integrate with other components in the final product. Understanding the design requirements of the entire product and its intended use can help you design sheet metal parts that integrate seamlessly and function properly. By considering assembly and integration requirements during the design process, you can avoid common sheet metal design mistakes and create high-quality parts that meet your specific requirements.

Conclusion

When designing sheet metal parts, there are several common design mistakes that can lead to increased manufacturing costs, quality issues, or failures during use. Some of the most common design mistakes include choosing improper material thickness, lack of proper bend relief, overly compact designs, not considering the capabilities and requirements of the manufacturer, and not fully considering overall design requirements. To avoid these design mistakes, designers should carefully consider material thickness, incorporate proper bend relief, avoid overly compact designs, consider manufacturer capabilities and requirements, and fully consider overall design requirements. By taking these steps, designers can create sheet metal parts that are both high-quality and functional, meeting the needs of both the manufacturer and end-user.

Do you like working with a specialist manufacturer of customised sheet metal parts? Contact us today!